Read the Hand

 Photo by Melody Weintraub

Photo by Melody Weintraub

We can get busy. Sometimes we can get too busy. In the heat of a busy, fun, exciting, wonderful day occasionally we make a promise..which we forget..which our students do not forget. It might be something random, like, “Yes, I promise to bring my banjo to Art tomorrow.” Then like a paper airplane icon on the laptop it flies right out of our mind. Promises are important to children. If we did a survey, we might discover that promises are the most important thing to children. A promise could be evidence to a child that they are loved. It is definitely reassurance when fulfilled. Children need promises, but they also need to see follow-through. It gives them a sense of security and stability in a world that is sometimes shaky and definitely ever-changing. Be careful about making promises you can’t keep. Children are handed enough of those throughout a lifetime. Let your promise be something simple and do whatever it takes to fulfill it..even if it means letting a 6th grade student misspell it on your hand in black marker.